Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmdd-4-2545-2011
© Author(s) 2011. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Development and technical paper
28 Sep 2011
Review status
This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD). A final paper in GMD is not foreseen.
Modelling oxygen isotopes in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model
C. E. Brennan1, A. J. Weaver1, M. Eby1, and K. J. Meissner2 1University of Victoria School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
2University of New South Wales Climate Change Research Centre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Abstract. Implementing oxygen isotopes (H218O, H216O) in coupled climate models provides both an important test of the individual model's hydrological cycle, and a powerful tool to mechanistically explore past climate changes while producing results directly comparable to isotope proxy records. Here we describe the addition of oxygen isotopes in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). Equilibrium simulations are performed for preindustrial and Last Glacial Maximum conditions. The oxygen isotope content in the model preindustrial climate is compared against observations for precipitation and seawater. The distribution of oxygen isotopes during the LGM is compared against available paleo-reconstructions.

Citation: Brennan, C. E., Weaver, A. J., Eby, M., and Meissner, K. J.: Modelling oxygen isotopes in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 4, 2545-2576, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmdd-4-2545-2011, 2011.
C. E. Brennan et al.
C. E. Brennan et al.
C. E. Brennan et al.

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