Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/gmd-2016-276
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Development and technical paper
30 Nov 2016
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper is under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).
The Met Office HadGEM3-ES Chemistry-Climate Model: Evaluation of stratospheric dynamics and its impact on ozone
Steven C. Hardiman1, Neal Butchart1, Fiona M. O'Connor1, and Steven T. Rumbold1,a 1Met Office Hadley Centre, Met Office, FitzRoy Road, Exeter, Devon, EX1 3PB, UK
anow at: National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading, RG6 6BB, UK
Abstract. Free-running and nudged versions of a Met Office chemistry-climate model are evaluated and used to investigate the impact of dynamics versus transport and chemistry within the model on the simulated evolution of stratospheric ozone. Metrics of the dynamical processes relevant for simulating stratospheric ozone are calculated, and the free-running model is found to outperform the previous model version in 12 of the 14 metrics. In particular, large biases in stratospheric transport and tropical tropopause temperature, which existed in the previous model version, are substantially reduced, making the current model more suitable for the simulation of stratospheric ozone. The spatial structure of the ozone hole, the area of polar stratospheric clouds, and the increased ozone concentrations in the northern hemisphere winter stratosphere following sudden stratospheric warmings, were all found to be sensitive to the accuracy of the dynamics and were better simulated in the nudged model than the free-running model. However, significant biases in stratospheric transport, water vapour and ozone concentrations still exist in the nudged model. Further, stratospheric transport biases lead to biases in the downward ozone flux into the troposphere. Thus, whilst nudging can, in general, provide a useful tool for removing the influence of dynamical biases from the evolution of chemical fields, this study shows that nudged models still remain far from perfect.

Citation: Hardiman, S. C., Butchart, N., O'Connor, F. M., and Rumbold, S. T.: The Met Office HadGEM3-ES Chemistry-Climate Model: Evaluation of stratospheric dynamics and its impact on ozone, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., doi:10.5194/gmd-2016-276, in review, 2016.
Steven C. Hardiman et al.
Steven C. Hardiman et al.
Steven C. Hardiman et al.

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Short summary
HadGEM3-ES is improved, with respect to the previous model, in 12 of the 14 metrics considered. A significant bias in stratospheric water vapour is reduced, allowing more accurate simulation of water vapour and ozone concentrations in the stratosphere. Dynamics are found to influence the spatial structure of the simulated ozone hole and the area of polar stratospheric clouds. This research was carried out as part of involvement in the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCM-I).
HadGEM3-ES is improved, with respect to the previous model, in 12 of the 14 metrics considered....
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