Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/gmd-2016-303
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Model description paper
12 Jan 2017
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper is under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).
BRICK v0.1, a simple, accessible, and transparent model framework for climate and regional sea-level projections
Tony E. Wong1,*, Alexander Bakker1,*,a, Kelsey Ruckert1, Patrick Applegate1,b, Aimée Slangen2,c, and Klaus Keller1,3,4 1Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
2Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
3Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
4Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15289, USA
anow at: Rijkswaterstaat, Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment, The Netherlands
bnow at: Research Square, Durham, NC 27701, USA
cnow at: Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Department of Estuarine & Delta Systems (EDS), Yerseke,The Netherlands
*These authors contributed equally to this work.
Abstract. Simple models can play pivotal roles in the quantification and framing of uncertainties surrounding climate change and sea-level rise. They are computationally efficient, transparent, and easier to reproduce. These qualities make simple models useful for uncertainty quantification and risk characterization. Simple model codes are increasingly distributed as open source, as well as actively shared and guided. Alas, computer codes used in the geosciences can often be hard to access, run, modify (e.g., with regards to assumptions and model components), and review. Here, we introduce a simple model framework for projections of global mean temperatures as well as regional sea levels and coastal flood risk (BRICK: Building blocks for Relevant Ice and Climate Knowledge). The BRICK model framework is written in R and Fortran and aims to help mitigate these issues, while maintaining a high degree of computational efficiency. We demonstrate the flexibility of this framework through simple model intercomparison experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that BRICK is suitable for risk assessment applications by using a didactic example in local flood risk management.

Citation: Wong, T. E., Bakker, A., Ruckert, K., Applegate, P., Slangen, A., and Keller, K.: BRICK v0.1, a simple, accessible, and transparent model framework for climate and regional sea-level projections, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., doi:10.5194/gmd-2016-303, in review, 2017.
Tony E. Wong et al.
Tony E. Wong et al.
Tony E. Wong et al.

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Short summary
We present the Building blocks for Relevant Ice and Climate Knowledge (BRICK) model v0.1. BRICK is a model for hindcasting past and projecting future surface temperature and sea-level rise, resolving the sea-level contributions from glaciers and ice caps, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, and thermal expansion. BRICK is specifically designed to support decision analyses through its transparency, and includes functionality to scale global sea-level estimates to regional projections.
We present the Building blocks for Relevant Ice and Climate Knowledge (BRICK) model v0.1. BRICK...
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