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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2017-209
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Model experiment description paper
06 Oct 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).
A protocol for the intercomparison of marine fishery and ecosystem models: Fish-MIP v1.0
Derek P. Tittensor1,2, Tyler D. Eddy2,3, Heike K. Lotze2, Eric D. Galbraith4,5, William Cheung3, Manuel Barange6,7, Julia L. Blanchard8, Laurent Bopp9, Andrea Bryndum-Buchholz2, Matthias Büchner10, Catherine Bulman11, David A. Carozza12, Villy Christensen13, Marta Coll14,15, John P. Dunne16, Jose A. Fernandes7,17, Elizabeth A. Fulton11,18, Alistair J. Hobday11,18, Veronika Huber10, Simon Jennings19,20,21, Miranda Jones3, Patrick Lehodey22, Jason S. Link23, Steve Mackinson19, Olivier Maury24,25, Susa Niiranen26, Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos27, Tilla Roy9,28, Jacob Schewe10, Yunne-Jai Shin25,29, Charles A. Stock16, Philip J. Underwood1, Jan Volkholz10, James R. Watson26, and Nicola D. Walker19 1United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, 219 Huntingdon Road, Cambridge, CB3 0DL, UK
2Department of Biology, Life Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, N.S., B3H 4R2, Canada
3Nippon Foundation – Nereus Program, Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z4, Canada
4Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Spain
5Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA) and Department of Mathematics, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
6Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Resources Division, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, 00153, Italy
7Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth, PL13 DH, UK
8Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, 20 Castray Esplanade, Battery Point. TAS. 7004, Private Bag 129, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia
9Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace/Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, CNRS/CEA/UVSQ, CE Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, France
10Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Telegrafenberg A56, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
11CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, GPO 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
12Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, H3A 0E8, Canada
13Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, University of British Columbia, 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
14Institute of Marine Science (ICM-CSIC), Passeig Marítim de la Barceloneta, no. 37–49, 08003, Barcelona, Spain
15Institut de Recherche pour le Développment, UMR MARBEC & LMI ICEMASA, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, Cape Town 7701, South Africa
16Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
17AZTI, Herrera Kaia, Portualdea z/g, Pasaia (Gipu zkoa), 20110, Spain
18Centre for Marine Socioecology, University of Tasmania, 20 Castray Esplanade, Battery Point, Tasmania, 7004, Australia
19Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), Lowestoft Laboratory, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT, UK
20School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK
21International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, H. C. Andersens Blvd 46, 1553 København V, Denmark
22CLS, 11 rue Hermes 31520 Ramonv ille Saint Agne, France
23National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, 166 Water Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
24IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement) – UMR 248 MARBEC, Av Jean Monnet CS 30171, 34 203 Sète cedex, France
25University of Cape Town, Dept. of Oceanography – International Lab. ICEMASA Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town, South Africa
26Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B, SE-114 19 Stockholm, Sweden
27Instituto del Mar del Perú (IMARPE), Gamarra y General Valle s/n Chucuito, Callao, Perú
28ECOCEANA (Ecosystem, Climate and Ocean Analysis), 57 Rue Archereau, Paris, 75019, France
29University of Cape Town, Marine Research (MA-RE) Institute, Department of Biological Sciences, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa
Abstract. Model intercomparison studies in the climate and earth sciences communities have been crucial to build credibility and coherence for future projections. They have quantified variability among models, spurred model development, contrasted within- and among-model uncertainty, assessed model fits to historical data, and provided ensemble projections of future change under specified scenarios. Given the speed and magnitude of anthropogenic change in the marine environment, and consequent effects on food security, biodiversity, marine industries and society, the time is ripe for similar comparisons among models of fisheries and marine ecosystems. Here, we describe the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project protocol version 1.0 (Fish-MIP v1.0), part of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP), a cross-sectoral network of climate impact modellers. Given the complexity of the marine ecosystem, this class of models has substantial heterogeneity of purpose, scope, theoretical underpinning, processes considered, parameterizations, resolution (grain size) and spatial extent. This heterogeneity reflects the lack of a unified understanding of the marine ecosystem, and implies that the assemblage of all models is more likely to include a greater number of relevant processes than is any single model. The current Fish-MIP protocol is designed to allow these heterogeneous models to be forced with common Earth System Model (ESM) CMIP5 outputs under prescribed scenarios for historic (from 1950s) and future (to 2100) time periods; it will be adapted to CMIP6 in future iterations. It also describes a standardized set of outputs for each participating Fish-MIP model to produce. This enables the broad characterization of differences between, and uncertainties within, models and projections when assessing climate and fisheries impacts on marine ecosystems and the services they provide. The systematic generation, collation and comparison of results from Fish-MIP will inform understanding of the range of plausible changes in marine ecosystems, and improve our capacity to define and convey strengths and weaknesses of model-based advice on future states of marine ecosystems and fisheries. Ultimately, Fish-MIP represents a step towards bringing together the marine ecosystem modelling community to produce consistent ensemble medium- and long-term projections of marine ecosystems.

Citation: Tittensor, D. P., Eddy, T. D., Lotze, H. K., Galbraith, E. D., Cheung, W., Barange, M., Blanchard, J. L., Bopp, L., Bryndum-Buchholz, A., Büchner, M., Bulman, C., Carozza, D. A., Christensen, V., Coll, M., Dunne, J. P., Fernandes, J. A., Fulton, E. A., Hobday, A. J., Huber, V., Jennings, S., Jones, M., Lehodey, P., Link, J. S., Mackinson, S., Maury, O., Niiranen, S., Oliveros-Ramos, R., Roy, T., Schewe, J., Shin, Y.-J., Stock, C. A., Underwood, P. J., Volkholz, J., Watson, J. R., and Walker, N. D.: A protocol for the intercomparison of marine fishery and ecosystem models: Fish-MIP v1.0, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2017-209, in review, 2017.
Derek P. Tittensor et al.
Derek P. Tittensor et al.
Derek P. Tittensor et al.

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Short summary
Model intercomparison studies in the climate and earth sciences communities have been crucial for future projections. Given the speed and magnitude of anthropogenic change in the marine environment, the time is ripe for similar comparisons among models of fisheries and marine ecosystems. We describe the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project, which brings together the marine ecosystem modelling community to inform long-term projections of marine ecosystems.
Model intercomparison studies in the climate and earth sciences communities have been crucial...
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