Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.252 IF 4.252
  • IF 5-year value: 4.890 IF 5-year 4.890
  • CiteScore value: 4.49 CiteScore 4.49
  • SNIP value: 1.539 SNIP 1.539
  • SJR value: 2.404 SJR 2.404
  • IPP value: 4.28 IPP 4.28
  • h5-index value: 40 h5-index 40
  • Scimago H index value: 51 Scimago H index 51
Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-172
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Model evaluation paper 05 Sep 2018

Model evaluation paper | 05 Sep 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Impact of model resolution on Holocene climate simulations of the Northern Hemisphere

Axel Wagner1,2, Gerrit Lohmann1,2,3, and Matthias Prange2,3 Axel Wagner et al.
  • 1Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, 27570, Germany
  • 2University of Bremen, Bremen, 28359, Germany
  • 3MARUM, Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, Bremen, 28359, Germany

Abstract. This study demonstrates the dependence of simulated surface air temperatures on variations in grid resolution and resolution-dependent orography in simulations of the Mid-Holocene. A set of Mid-Holocene sensitivity experiments is carried out with the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 forced with sea surface temperature and sea ice fields from coupled simulations. Each experiment was performed in two resolution modes: low (~3.75°, 19 vertical levels) and high (~1.1°, 31 vertical levels). Results are compared to respective preindustrial runs. It is found that the large-scale temperature anomalies for the Mid-Holocene (compared to the preindustrial) are significantly different in the low- and high-resolution versions. For boreal winter, differences are related to circulation changes caused by the response to thermal forcing in conjunction with orographic resolution. For summer, shortwave cloud radiative forcing emerges as the predominant factor. In summary, the simulated Mid-Holocene temperature differences (low versus high resolution) reveal a response that regionally exceeds the Mid-Holocene to preindustrial modelled temperature anomalies, and show partly reversed signs across the same geographical regions. Our results imply that climate change simulations sensitively depend on the chosen grid resolutions.

Axel Wagner et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Topical Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Axel Wagner et al.
Axel Wagner et al.
Viewed
Total article views: 393 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
313 75 5 393 4 4
  • HTML: 313
  • PDF: 75
  • XML: 5
  • Total: 393
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Sep 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Sep 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 393 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 392 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 13 Nov 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
This study demonstrates the dependence of simulated surface air temperatures on variations in grid resolution and resolution-dependent orography in simulations of the Mid-Holocene. A set of Mid-Holocene sensitivity experiments is carried out. The simulated Mid-Holocene temperature differences (low versus high resolution) reveal a response that regionally exceeds the Mid-Holocene to preindustrial modelled temperature anomalies, and show partly reversed signs across the same geographical regions.
This study demonstrates the dependence of simulated surface air temperatures on variations in...
Citation
Share