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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-258
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-258
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Development and technical paper 11 Feb 2019

Development and technical paper | 11 Feb 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Incorporating Wind Sheltering and Sediment Heat Flux into 1-D Models of Small Boreal Lakes: A Case Study with the Canadian Small Lake Model V2.0

Murray D. MacKay Murray D. MacKay
  • Science and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto, M3H5T4, Canada

Abstract. Lake models are increasingly being incorporated into global and regional climate and numerical weather prediction systems. Lakes interact with their surroundings through flux exchange at their bottom sediments and with the atmosphere at the surface, and these linkages must be well represented in fully coupled prognostic systems in order to completely elucidate the role of lakes in the climate system. In this study schemes for the inclusion of wind sheltering and sediment heat flux simple enough to be included in any one dimensional lake model are presented. Example simulations with the Canadian Small Lake Model show improvements in surface wind driven mixing and temperature in summer, and a reduction of the bias in the change in heat content under ice compared with a published simulation based on an earlier version of the model.

Murray D. MacKay
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 08 Apr 2019)
Status: open (until 08 Apr 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Murray D. MacKay
Model code and software

CSLM V2.0 M. MacKay https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2554524

Murray D. MacKay
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Short summary
Lakes interact with their surroundings through flux exchange at their bottom sediments and with the atmosphere at the surface, and these linkages must be represented in climate and weather prediction models in order to completely elucidate the role of lakes in the climate system. Here schemes for the inclusion of wind sheltering and sediment heat flux simple enough to be included in any one dimensional lake model are presented, along with example simulations of the Canadian Small Lake Model.
Lakes interact with their surroundings through flux exchange at their bottom sediments and with...
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