Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.252 IF 4.252
  • IF 5-year value: 4.890 IF 5-year 4.890
  • CiteScore value: 4.49 CiteScore 4.49
  • SNIP value: 1.539 SNIP 1.539
  • SJR value: 2.404 SJR 2.404
  • IPP value: 4.28 IPP 4.28
  • h5-index value: 40 h5-index 40
  • Scimago H index value: 51 Scimago H index 51
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-279
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-279
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Development and technical paper 21 Nov 2018

Development and technical paper | 21 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Improvements to stratospheric chemistry scheme in the UM-UKCA (v10.7) model: solar cycle and heterogeneous reactions

Fraser Dennison1, James Keeble2,3, Olaf Morgenstern1, Guang Zeng1, N. Luke Abraham2,3, and Xin Yang4 Fraser Dennison et al.
  • 1National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand
  • 2Centre for Atmospheric Science, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
  • 3National Centre for Atmospheric Science, UK
  • 4British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Abstract. Improvements are made to two areas of the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosol (UKCA) module, which forms part of the Met Office Unified Model (UM) used for weather and climate applications. Firstly, a solar cycle is added to the photolysis scheme. The effect on total column ozone of this addition was found to be around 1–2% in mid-latitude and equatorial regions in phase with the solar cycle. Secondly, reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol are updated and extended by modification of the uptake coefficients of five existing reactions and the addition of a further eight reactions involving bromine species. These modifications are shown to reduce the overabundance of modeled total-column ozone in the Arctic during October to February, southern mid-latitudes during August, and the Antarctic during September. Antarctic springtime ozone depletion is shown to be enhanced by 25 DU on average, which now causes the ozone hole to be somewhat too deep compared to observations. We show that this is in part due to a cold bias of the Antarctic polar vortex in the model.

Fraser Dennison et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 16 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 16 Jan 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Fraser Dennison et al.
Data sets

Improvements to stratospheric chemistry scheme in the UM-UKCA (v10.7) model: solar cycle and heterogeneous reactions F. Dennison https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1486305

Fraser Dennison et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 188 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
145 39 4 188 4 3
  • HTML: 145
  • PDF: 39
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 188
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 21 Nov 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 21 Nov 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 187 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 184 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 10 Dec 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Two developments are made to the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UKCA) model in order to improve simulation of stratospheric ozone. The first is the addition of a solar cycle. The influence on ozone from the solar cycle is found to be 1–2 %, which is consistent with other studies. The second is to the heterogeneous chemistry; the most significant change being the addition of reactions involving bromine species. This was shown to reduce ozone biases relative to observations in most regions.
Two developments are made to the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UKCA) model in order to...
Citation
Share