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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-309
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-309
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Model experiment description paper 17 Jan 2019

Model experiment description paper | 17 Jan 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) and is expected to appear here in due course.

The DeepMIP contribution to PMIP4: methodologies for selection, compilation and analysis of latest Paleocene and early Eocene climate proxy data, incorporating version 0.1 of the DeepMIP database

Christopher J. Hollis1, Tom Dunkley Jones2, Eleni Anagnostou3,4, Peter K. Bijl5, Margot J. Cramwinckel5, Ying Cui6, Gerald R. Dickens7, Kirsty M. Edgar2, Yvette Eley2, David Evans8, Gavin L. Foster3, Joost Frieling5, Gordon N. Inglis9, Elizabeth M. Kennedy1, Reinhard Kozdon10, Vittoria Lauretano9, Caroline H. Lear11, Kate Littler12, Nele Meckler13, B. David A. Naafs9, Heiko Pälike14, Richard D. Pancost9, Paul Pearson11, Dana L. Royer15, Ulrich Salzmann16, Brian Schubert17, Hannu Seebeck1, Appy Sluijs5, Robert Speijer18, Peter Stassen18, Jessica Tierney19, Aradhna Tripati20, Bridget Wade21, Thomas Westerhold14, Caitlyn Witkowski22, James C. Zachos23, Yi Ge Zhang24, Matthew Huber25, and Daniel J. Lunt26 Christopher J. Hollis et al.
  • 1GNS Science, Lower Hutt, New Zealand
  • 2School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK
  • 3Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, UK
  • 4GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany
  • 5Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
  • 6Department of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, USA
  • 7Department of Earth Sciences, Rice University, Texas, USA
  • 8Institute of Geosciences, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • 9School of Chemistry & School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, UK
  • 10Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, USA
  • 11School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, UK
  • 12Camborne School of Mines & Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, UK
  • 13Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen, Norway
  • 14MARUM, University of Bremen, Germany
  • 15Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University, USA
  • 16Department of Geography, Northumbria University, UK
  • 17School of Geosciences, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Louisiana, USA
  • 18Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, KU Leuven, Belgium
  • 19Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, USA
  • 20Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  • 21Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, UK
  • 22Department of Marine Microbiology and Biogeochemistry (MMB), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Utrecht University, Den Burg, the Netherlands
  • 23Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA
  • 24Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, USA
  • 25Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, USA
  • 26School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

Abstract. The early Eocene (56 to 48 million years ago) is inferred to have been the most recent time that Earth's atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeded 1000 ppm. Global mean temperatures were also substantially warmer than present day. As such, study of early Eocene climate provides insight into how a super-warm Earth system behaves and offers an opportunity to evaluate climate models under conditions of high greenhouse gas forcing. The Deep Time Model Intercomparison Project (DeepMIP) is a systematic model-model and model-data intercomparison of three early Paleogne time slices: latest Paleocene, Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum and early Eocene climatic optimum. A previous article outlined the model experimental design for climate model simulations. In this article, we outline the methodologies to be used for the compilation and analysis of climate proxy data, primarily proxies for temperature and CO2. This paper establishes the protocols for a concerted and coordinated effort to compile the climate proxy records across a wide geographic range. The resulting climate atlas will be used to constrain and evaluate climate models for the three selected time intervals, and provide insights into the mechanisms that control these warm climate states. We provide version 0.1 of this database, in anticipation that this will be expanded in subsequent publications.

Christopher J. Hollis et al.
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
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Christopher J. Hollis et al.
Christopher J. Hollis et al.
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Short summary
The Deep-Time Model Intercomparison Project (DeepMIP) is a model-data intercomparison of the early Eocene (around 55 million years ago), the last time that Earth's atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeded 1000 ppm. Previously, we outlined the experimental design for climate model simulations. Here, we outline the methods used for compilation and analysis of climate proxy data. The resulting climate “atlas” will be provide insights into the mechanisms that control past warm climate states.
The Deep-Time Model Intercomparison Project (DeepMIP) is a model-data intercomparison of the...
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