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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-338
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-338
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Model description paper 12 Feb 2019

Model description paper | 12 Feb 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

CLIMADA – a global weather and climate risk assessment platform

Gabriela Aznar-Siguan1,2 and David N. Bresch1,2 Gabriela Aznar-Siguan and David N. Bresch
  • 1Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss, Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract. The need for assessing the risk of extreme weather events is ever increasing. In addition to quantification of risk today, the role of aggravating factors such as high population growth and changing climate conditions do matter, too. We present the open source software CLIMADA, which integrates hazard, exposure and vulnerability to compute the necessary metrics to assess risk and to quantify socio-economic impact. The software design is modular and object-oriented, offering a simple collaborative framework and a parallelization strategy which allows for scalable computations on clusters. CLIMADA supports multi-hazard calculations and provides an event-based probabilistic approach that is globally consistent for a wide range of resolutions, suitable for whole-country to detailed local studies. This paper uses the platform to estimate and contextualize the damage of hurricane Irma in the Caribbean in 2017. Most of the affected islands are non-sovereign countries and do also rely on overseas support in case disaster strikes. The risk assessment performed for this region, based on remotely available data available shortly before or hours after landfall of Irma, proves to be close to reported damage and hence demonstrates a method to provide readily available impact estimates and associated uncertainties in real time.

Gabriela Aznar-Siguan and David N. Bresch
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Status: open (until 09 Apr 2019)
Status: open (until 09 Apr 2019)
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Gabriela Aznar-Siguan and David N. Bresch
Gabriela Aznar-Siguan and David N. Bresch
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Latest update: 21 Feb 2019
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Short summary
The need for assessing the risk of weather events is ever increasing. In addition to quantification of risk today, the role of aggravating factors such as population growth and changing climate conditions matter too. We present the open source software CLIMADA, which integrates hazard, exposure and vulnerability to compute metrics to assess risk and to quantify socio-economic impact, and use it to estimate and contextualise the damage of hurricane Irma through the Caribbean in 2017.
The need for assessing the risk of weather events is ever increasing. In addition to...
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