Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-68
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Development and technical paper
02 May 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).
Marine biogeochemical cycling and climate-carbon cycle feedback simulated by the NUIST Earth System Model: NESM-2.0.1
Yifei Dai1, Long Cao2, and Bin Wang1,3 1Earth System Modeling Center, and Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and technology, Nanjing 210044, China
2Department of Atmospheric Sciences, School of Earth Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China
3Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Atmosphere-Ocean Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu HI 96822, USA
Abstract. In this study, we evaluate the performance of Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology Earth System Model, version 2.0.1 (hereafter NESM-2.0.1). We focus on model simulated historical and future oceanic CO2 uptake, and analyze the effect of global warming on model-simulated oceanic CO2 uptake. Compared with available observations and data-based estimates, NESM-2.0.1 reproduces reasonably well large-scale ocean carbon-related fields, including nutrients (phosphate, nitrite and silicate), chlorophyll, and net primary production. However, some noticeable discrepancies between model simulations and observations are found in the deep ocean and coastal regions. Model-simulated current-day oceanic CO2 uptake compares well with data-based estimate. From pre-industrial time to 2011, modeled cumulative CO2 uptake is 144 PgC, compared with data-based estimates of 155 ± 30 PgC. Diagnosed from the end of the benchmark 1 % per year CO2 increase simulations, carbon-climate feedback parameter, which represents the sensitivity of ocean CO2 uptake to climate change, is −7.1 PgC/K; Carbon-concentration feedback parameter, which represents the sensitivity of ocean CO2 uptake to increase in atmospheric CO2 is 0.81 PgC/ppm. These two feedback parameters diagnosed from model simulations are consistent with the mean value diagnosed from the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5) model simulations under the same 1 % per year CO2 simulations (−7.8 PgC/K and 0.80 PgC/ppm, respectively). Our results demonstrate that NESM-2.0.1 can be used as a useful tool in the investigation of feedback interactions between the ocean carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2, and climate change.
Citation: Dai, Y., Cao, L., and Wang, B.: Marine biogeochemical cycling and climate-carbon cycle feedback simulated by the NUIST Earth System Model: NESM-2.0.1, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-68, in review, 2018.
Yifei Dai et al.
Yifei Dai et al.

Model code and software

source code, input data, and user guide Y. Dai, L. Cao, and B. Wang https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1184747
Yifei Dai et al.

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Short summary
NESM-2.0.1 is one of the few models from China that present the ocean carbon cycle simulations. Our results demonstrate that NESM-2.0.1 does a reasonable job in simulating current-day marine ecosystems and oceanic CO2 uptake. The model also can be used as a useful tool in the investigation of feedback interactions between the ocean carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2, and climate change.
NESM-2.0.1 is one of the few models from China that present the ocean carbon cycle simulations....
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