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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-97
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2018-97
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Model description paper 06 Jun 2018

Model description paper | 06 Jun 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript for further review has not been submitted.

A simple weather generator for applications with limited data availability: TEmpotRain 1.0 for temperatures, extraterrestrial radiation, and potential evapotranspiration

Gerrit Huibert de Rooij Gerrit Huibert de Rooij
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Soil System Science Dept., Theodor−Lieser−Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany

Abstract. A weather generator is introduced that has a Bartlett−Lewis rainfall generator in which storms with exponentially distributed time intervals between their starting times consist of cells of which the intervals between their starting times are exponentially distributed, and their durations and rainfall rates are both gamma–distributed. Each day is either overcast or clear, with the probability of a cloudy day depending on the daily rainfall. A temperature generator uses a sinusoidal annual signal of which the mean and the amplitude are both normally distributed. For overcast days, the amplitude is reduced. Superimposed on this signal is a first–order autoregressive model with independently identically normally distributed shocks for the daily mean temperature, which is assumed to be the average of the daily minimum and maximum temperature. The difference between the daily mean and extremes follows a lognormal distribution, the standard deviation of which is reduced for overcast days. The daily extraterrestrial radiation, mean and extreme temperatures, and, for one of the two models used, the 30–day rainfall sum, determine the daily potential evapotranspiration. To permit the generation of very long time series, leap years are taken into account. One hundred years of weather data were generated for two contrasting climates. The results show that the choice of the evapotranspiration model is consequential for temperate climates. Additional calculations demonstrate the effect of the daily temperature fluctuations on the potential evapotranspiration. Standard computational resources (laptop) suffice to run the weather generator. The Fortran90 source codes, input file formats, and user manual are provided.

Gerrit Huibert de Rooij
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Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Gerrit Huibert de Rooij
Gerrit Huibert de Rooij
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Latest update: 18 Jun 2019
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Short summary
Areas that have few or no weather stations or are subject to climate change still need weather data in order to model the demand for water, the risk of floods and droughts, etc. TEmpotRain generates rainfall, daily temperature extremes, and daily potential evaporation (from the soil) / transpiration (by plants). The physical meaning of the model parameters is clear. This allows realistic values for them to be estimated, even for hypothetical (future) climates for which data are not available.
Areas that have few or no weather stations or are subject to climate change still need weather...
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