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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-187
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-187
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: model description paper 25 Sep 2019

Submitted as: model description paper | 25 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Jena Soil Model: a microbial soil organic carbon model integrated with nitrogen and phosphorus processes

Lin Yu1, Bernhard Ahrens1, Thomas Wutzler1, Marion Schrumpf1,2, and Sönke Zaehle1,2 Lin Yu et al.
  • 1Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Hans-Knöll Str. 10, 07745 Jena, Germany
  • 2International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Jena, Germany

Abstract. The plant-soil interactions in a changing environment, such as the response of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition, nutrient release, and plant uptake to elevated CO2 concentration, is essential to understand the global carbon (C) cycling and predict potential future climate feedbacks. These processes are poorly represented in current terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) due to the simple linear approach of SOM cycling and the ignorance of variation within the soil profile. While the emerging microbially-explicit soil organic carbon models can better describe C formation and turnover processes, they lack so far a coupling to nutrient cycles. Here we present a new SOM model, JSM (Jena Soil Model), which is microbially-explicit, vertically resolved, and integrated with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycle processes. JSM includes a representation of enzyme allocation to different depolymerisation sources based on the microbial adaptation approach, and a representation of nutrient acquisition competition based on the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) approach. We present the model structure and basic features of the model performance against a German beech forest site. The model is capable of reproducing the main SOM stocks, microbial biomass, and their vertical patterns of the soil profile. We further test the model sensitivity to its parameterisation and show that JSM is generally sensitive to the change of microbial stoichiometry and microbial processes.

Lin Yu et al.
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Status: final response (author comments only)
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Latest update: 15 Dec 2019
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Short summary
In this paper, we have developed a new soil organic carbon model which describes the formation and turnover of soil organic matter in a more mechanistic manner. With this model, we are able to better represent how microorganisms and nutrient processes influence the belowground carbon storage and better explain some observed features of soil organic matter. We hope this model can increase our confidence in predictions on future climate change, particularly on how soil can mitigate the process.
In this paper, we have developed a new soil organic carbon model which describes the formation...
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