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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-191
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-191
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: review and perspective paper 03 Sep 2019

Submitted as: review and perspective paper | 03 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Current status on the need for improved accessibility to climate change models

Juan Antonio Añel1, Michael García-Rodríguez1,2, and Javier Rodeiro2 Juan Antonio Añel et al.
  • 1EPhysLab, Ed. Campus da Auga, Campus As Lagoas, 32004, Ourense, Galicia, Spain
  • 2School of Computer Sciences, Campus As Lagoas, 32004, Ourense, Galicia, Spain

Abstract. Over the last years, we have seen growing concerns on the need to publish computer code as an integral part of the research process. This has been reflected on improved publishing policies by scientific journals, addressing the relevant issues such as repositories or licensing. Here we explore the state-of-the-art of code availability and sharing for climate models, using as testbed the models from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 and make some reflections on it. Our results show that there are great limitations in the access to the code of these climate models and that the climate modelling community needs to greatly improve their code sharing practices in order to comply with the best scientific practices and the most up to date editorial publishing policies.

Juan Antonio Añel et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 29 Oct 2019)
Status: open (until 29 Oct 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Juan Antonio Añel et al.
Juan Antonio Añel et al.
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Latest update: 21 Sep 2019
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Short summary
This work shows that it continues to be hard, if not impossible, to obtain some of the most used climate models worldwide. We reach this conclusion through a systematic study and encourage all the development teams and research centres to make public the models that they use to produce scientific results.
This work shows that it continues to be hard, if not impossible, to obtain some of the most used...
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