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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-286
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-286
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: model description paper 16 Jan 2020

Submitted as: model description paper | 16 Jan 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal GMD.

MFIT 1.0.0: Multiflow inversion of tracer breakthrough curves in fractured and karst aquifers

Jacques Bodin Jacques Bodin
  • Université de Poitiers, CNRS, UMR 7285 IC2MP, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers Cedex, France

Abstract. More than half of the Earth’s population depends largely or entirely on fractured or karst aquifers for their drinking water supply. Both the characterization and modeling of these groundwater reservoirs are therefore of worldwide concern. Artificial tracer testing is a widely used method for the characterization of solute (including contaminant) transport in groundwater. Tracer experiments consist of a two-step procedure: 1) introducing a conservative tracer-labeled solution into an aquifer, usually through a sinkhole or a well, and 2) measuring the concentration breakthrough curve (BTC) response(s) at one or several downstream monitoring locations, usually spring(s) or pumping well(s). However, the modeling and interpretation of tracer test responses can be a challenging task in some cases, notably when the BTCs exhibit multiple local peaks and/or extensive backward tailing. MFIT is a new open-source, Windows-based computer package for the analytical modeling of tracer BTCs. This software integrates four transport models that are all capable of simulating single- or multiple-peak and/or heavy-tailed BTCs. The four transport models are encapsulated in a general multiflow modeling framework, which assumes that the spatial heterogeneity of an aquifer can be approximated by a combination of independent one-dimensional channels. Two of the MFIT transport models are believed to be new, as they combine the multiflow approach and the double-porosity concept, which is applied at the scale of the individual channels. Another salient feature of MFIT is its compatibility and interface with the advanced optimization tools of the PEST suite of programs. Hence, MFIT is the first BTC fitting tool that allows regularized inversion and nonlinear analysis of the postcalibration uncertainty of model parameters.

Jacques Bodin

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Status: open (until 13 Mar 2020)
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Jacques Bodin

Model code and software

MFIT 1.0.0 J. Bodin https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3470751

Jacques Bodin

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Latest update: 28 Feb 2020
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Short summary
Fractured and karst aquifers constitute important groundwater reservoirs worldwide but are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic pollution. MFIT is a new GUI-based software for the analytical modeling of artificial tracer tests in such media. It integrates four transport models that are all capable of simulating complex (multimodal and/or heavy-tailed) tracer breakthrough curve responses, and includes advanced tools for the automatic calibration and uncertainty analysis of model parameters.
Fractured and karst aquifers constitute important groundwater reservoirs worldwide but are...
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