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Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-35
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-35
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Development and technical paper 13 Mar 2019

Development and technical paper | 13 Mar 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Dealing with discontinuos meteorological forcing in operational ocean modelling

Bjarne Büchmann Bjarne Büchmann
  • FCOO: Joint GeoMETOC Support Center, Danish Defence Acquisition and Logistics Organization (DALO), Lautrupbjerg1-5, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark

Abstract. Meteorological data providers release updated forecasts several times per day – at the forecast epochs. The first time step (t = 0) of each forecast, the so-called analysis step, is updated by a data-assimilation process, so that the meteorological fields at this time in general do not match the fields from the previous forecast. Seen from the perspective of oceanographic modelling, the analysis step represents a possible discontinuity in the model forcing. Unless care is taken, this meteorological discontinuity may generate spurious waves in the ocean model. The problem is examined and quantified for a single meteorological model: the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). A simple straight-forward solution is suggested to overcome the forcing discontinuity, and the effect on a particular ocean model is examined: the FCOO NA3 (North Atlantic 3 nm) storm surge model.

Bjarne Büchmann
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Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Bjarne Büchmann
Bjarne Büchmann
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Latest update: 20 May 2019
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Short summary
Operational forecasting of the ocean state – used for e.g. ship route planning, sea rescue, and oil spill drift models – relies on data (forcing) obtained from weather forecasting. Unfortunately, the so-called meteorological analysis step introduces a discontinuity, which affects the ocean models adversely. In the present paper, a straight-forward method to deal with the issue is introduced. Practical examples are given to illuminate the scale of the problem.
Operational forecasting of the ocean state – used for e.g. ship route planning, sea rescue, and...
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