Journal cover Journal topic
Geoscientific Model Development An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.154 IF 5.154
  • IF 5-year value: 5.697 IF 5-year
    5.697
  • CiteScore value: 5.56 CiteScore
    5.56
  • SNIP value: 1.761 SNIP 1.761
  • IPP value: 5.30 IPP 5.30
  • SJR value: 3.164 SJR 3.164
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 59 Scimago H
    index 59
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-85
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-2019-85
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Development and technical paper 25 Apr 2019

Development and technical paper | 25 Apr 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD).

Developing a sequential cropping capability in the JULESvn5.2 land–surface model

Camilla Mathison1,2, Andrew J. Challinor2, Chetan Deva2, Pete Falloon1, Sébastien Garrigues3,4, Sophie Moulin3,4, Karina Williams1, and Andy Wiltshire1 Camilla Mathison et al.
  • 1Met Office Hadley Centre, FitzRoy Road, Exeter, EX1 3PB, UK
  • 2School of Earth and Environment, Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9AT, UK
  • 3EMMAH (UMR1114), INRA, Avignon, France
  • 4Université d’Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, UMR1114 – EMMAH, 84000 Avignon, France

Abstract. Sequential cropping (also known as multiple or double cropping) is a common feature, particularly for tropical regions, where the crop seasons are largely dictated by the main wet season such as the Asian summer monsoon (ASM). The ASM provides the water resources for crops grown for the whole year, thereby influencing crop production outside the ASM period. Land surface models (LSMs) typically simulate a single crop per year, however, in order to understand how sequential cropping influences demand for resources, we need to simulate all of the crops grown within a year in a seamless way. In this paper we implement sequential cropping in a branch of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) and demonstrate its use at Avignon, a site that uses the sequential cropping system and provides over 15-years of continuous flux observations which we use to evaluate JULES with sequential cropping. In order to implement the method in future regional simulations where there may be large variations in growing conditions, we apply the same method to four locations in the North Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar to simulate the rice--wheat rotation and compare model yields to observations at these locations. JULES is able to simulate sequential cropping at Avignon and the four India locations, representing both crops within one growing season in each of the crop rotations presented. At Avignon the maxima of LAI, above ground biomass and canopy height occur at approximately the correct time for both crops. The magnitudes of biomass, especially for winter wheat, are underestimated and the leaf area index is overestimated. The JULES fluxes are a good fit to observations (r-values greater than 0.7), either using grasses to represent crops or the crop model, implying that both approaches represent the surface coverage correctly. For the India simulations, JULES successfully reproduces observed yields for the eastern locations, however yields are under estimated for the western locations. This development is a step forward in the ability of JULES to simulate crops in tropical regions, where this cropping system is already prevalent, while also providing the opportunity to assess the potential for other regions to implement it as an adaptation to climate change.

Camilla Mathison et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Topical Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Camilla Mathison et al.
Camilla Mathison et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 239 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
187 50 2 239 3 4
  • HTML: 187
  • PDF: 50
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 239
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 25 Apr 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 25 Apr 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 210 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 205 with geography defined and 5 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Jul 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Tropical regions commonly plant different crops in the same field one after the other in rotation, this is sequential cropping (also known as multiple or double cropping). Land surface models (LSMs) typically simulate a single crop per year, but to understand demand for resources we need to simulate all of the crops grown within a year in a seamless way. We implement sequential cropping into JULES and demonstrate it works for a site in Avignon and 4 locations in India.
Tropical regions commonly plant different crops in the same field one after the other in...
Citation